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Pure London AW18-19 closes on a high, thanks to its ‘feel-good’ factor

London - Pure London closed its Autumn/Winter 2018-2019 edition this Tuesday on a high note, as creativity, inspirational and positivity were some of the key factors reigning throughout the event.

Pure London AW18-19 closes on a high, thanks to its ‘feel-good’ factor

As the UK’s online fashion and sourcing trade, linking manufacturers, fabric suppliers, designers, brands and retailers, Pure London welcomed a surge of visitors throughout its three-day event. Key takeaways from Pure London’s AW 18/19 edition included a new focus on sustainable fashion, experimentation, personalization, collaboration, and newness.

Pure London AW18-19 closes on a high, thanks to its ‘feel-good’ factor

During the first day of the event, Cosmopolitan Editor-in-Chief Farrar Storr, keynote speaker at Pure London, hit the nail on the head when she said that “during tough times we have to dig deep, lean into the discomfort, and that drives creativity.” She said: “To stand out now, you need to be a lot bolder, a lot quicker and a lot smarter in your approach. When things are difficult, creative’s are best equipped to deal with challenges.”

Pure London AW18-19 closes on a high, thanks to its ‘feel-good’ factor

Pure London enjoys successful AW18-19 edition

Similarly, Francesa Muston, Hear of Retail and Product Analysis at trend authority WGSN urged for greater experimentation and excitement in fashion retail paired with core commerciality to help drive consumer spending in the UK. She also stressed the increasing importance of sustainability and provenance for 2018. “We have seen a gradual increase over the last 18 months, but it feels credible and considered which is right for the industry.” She added that we “need to be aware, of where the product comes from, how it is made, and what it’s made from.”

Pure London AW18-19 closes on a high, thanks to its ‘feel-good’ factor

Sustainability was also a main theme in the content programme of Pure London’s newly launched manufacturing and sourcing section Pure Origin. Trend Forecaster and Fashion Designer Geraldine Wharry discussed trend forecasting for sustainability during her talk. She said: “The future of fashion forecasting is incorporating sustainability into the supply chain.”

Pure London AW18-19 closes on a high, thanks to its ‘feel-good’ factor

Pure London’s eight sections drew in a wide range of buyers this season, both from traditional stores as well as e-tailers including M&S, Asos, Topshop, Choice, Fred Funk, Net-a-Porter, Fenwick, H&M, Next, Maureen Cookson, Pamela Shiffer, and The Dressing Room. Visitors at the event were greeted by a number of inspirational stand designs, with many brands re-creating a store environment to capture the imagination of visitors. During the Pure London Display Awards held on Sunday, evening brands were awarded for their visual merchandising and stand design.

Pure London AW18-19 closes on a high, thanks to its ‘feel-good’ factor

“Brands make a huge effort to wow their buyers and their efforts have a massive impact on how the show looks and feels,” said Julie Driscoll, Managing Director of Pure London during the award ceremony on Sunday. “We want to take this opportunity to applaud your creativity and celebrate your amazing efforts.” Buyers were quick to share their appreciation of the effort brands make each season show at pure.

Pure London AW18-19 closes on a high, thanks to its ‘feel-good’ factor

Leona Fallen from McElhinneys in Ireland said: “We come to Pure London every season to find new brands that will excite our customers.” Amy Cook from Eighty Seven in Melbourne Derbyshire added: “I’ve been coming to Pure for 5 years and we’re after newness, emerging brands and exciting product that sets our boutique apart from others. Pure is essential for our buying calendar.” Overall Pure London reported positive general feedback from exhibitors regarding business taken, with a number of orders places from stores across the UK and as well as from countries including UAE, Qatar, Bahrain, Lebanon, Australia, Belgium, Brazil, France, Germany, Turkey, USA, and Ireland.

Pure London AW18-19 closes on a high, thanks to its ‘feel-good’ factor

“Pure London is a great order writing show for us. We’ve seen a good mix of UK and international buyers and the energy in the Spirit section is high,” commented Rishi Som from trend led fashion brand Urban Bliss. Daniel Morris from The Morris Fyfe Agency with Valentino Handbags and Replay Accessories added: “We’ve had a successful show, we had a target of new accounts to open and we’ve reached that target.” In particular, Pure Origin attracted a high turn out from buyers from Burberry, Tesco, Sainsbury’s, Harvey Nichols, while visitors shared praise for the educational content programme delivering key insights and driving the future agenda for fashion.

Pure London AW18-19 closes on a high, thanks to its ‘feel-good’ factor

Photos: Pure London AW18/19

Top 5 Trends from CIFF Copenhagen

Copenhagen’s leading contemporary trade show, CIFF returned for the Fall/Winter season to host an international contingent of women’s and men’s apparel and accessories brands. Upon entry, guests were invited into the immersive exhibition space containing multi-media brand collaborations, art installations and live workshops designed to involve visitors in the creative experience. The show space was divided by fashion genre, with each section decorated to represent the show’s brand categories such as Urban, Lab and Sleek. In the heart of the Bella Centre exhibition space, installations inspired by the Danish landscape made a dynamic statement with giant conifers suspended from the ceiling and reflected in the mirrored floors.

Trendstop gives FashionUnited readers an exclusive look at the top 5 trends from CIFF, Copenhagen.

Top 5 Trends from CIFF Copenhagen

A strong focus on seasonal outerwear was seen across both women’s and men’s fashion categories as rugged durability met high performance technology. Utilitarian themes have been a recurring trend, but this season designers at CIFF put several new spins on the theme, taking inspiration from workmen’s uniforms and safety gear, refining hardwearing styles through premium quality constructions and reviving retro fabrications such as corduroy for a practical take on nostalgia. Typography remained a popular choice for print and graphics for both genders, this time making use of new and unexpected placements and materials to give a fresh look to the genre.

Beyond The Limits

Technical, element-weathering designs are key for Fall/Winter footwear and accessories that incorporate durable hardware and sturdy, hiking boot traction. Insulating padded coats and jackets come in thick block quilting and bold sports inspired colour-ways or layered with practical, zip-through fleece underlayers. Waterproof panels and padded details add functionality to apparel, while climbing and mountaineering are key influences for accessories and detailing.

Top 5 Trends from CIFF Copenhagen

Images: CIFF Trade Show Display, Rodebjer, Colmar, all Fall Winter 2018-19

Refined Utility

Classic workwear silhouettes and fabrications are refined and updated for FW18-19 for a premium yet understated take on utilitarianism. Hardwearing materials such as cord, denim and tan leathers are given a cleaner, more minimalist aesthetic with neat shirting shapes and deep dyed indigo finishes. Considered detailing defines the trend, contrast pockets and stitchlines in two-tone neutrals, subtly highlight quality constructions and show the importance of attention to detail.

Top 5 Trends from CIFF Copenhagen

Images: The Cords and Co, Komono, Dorothee Schumacher, all Fall Winter 2018-19

Safety First

Unisex apparel takes direct inspiration from high-vis uniforms and building site graphics for FW18-19. Key design elements such as paint splattered reflective jackets and safety signage come in reflective orange, white and black colour combinations, enhanced by contrast detailing and performance trims. A new twist on the utility trend, this fresh translation can be applied across heavy-duty outdoor apparel, technical sportswear and fashion-forward athleisure where visibility is a necessity or simply a desirable style statement.

Top 5 Trends from CIFF Copenhagen

Images:UPWW, United Standard, Letasca, all Fall Winter 2018-19

The Corduroy Revival

The ongoing utility trend has inspired the revival of classic casual materials such as corduroy. A contemporary take on a retro fabrication, wide wales and micro cord textures breathe new life into a nostalgic favourite. Silhouettes are an essential part of this reimagining as MA1 bomber jackets, hoodies and casual outdoor boots are rendered in velveteen textured ribs that soften structures and provide apparel and accessories with a comforting, tactile handle.

Top 5 Trends from CIFF Copenhagen

Images: The Cords and Co, Suicoke, Alpha Industries x The Cords and Co, all Fall Winter 2018-19

New Type Placements

Slogans, lettering and typography have been a popular print theme for several seasons and the trend is showing no sign of slowing down. For Fall/Winter designers experiment with placement with messages and branding appearing on shoe laces and on the stirrups of leggings. Bold two-tone colour combinations best highlight text motifs while explorations with raised and rubberised techniques introduces a 3D embellished effect to otherwise flat surface patterns.

Top 5 Trends from CIFF Copenhagen

Images: Dr Martens x Martin Asbjorn, Rodebjer, Blanche, all Fall Winter 2018-19

Exclusive Offer

FashionUnited readers can get free access to Trendstop’s Spring Summer 2018 Copenhagen Trade Show Overview, featuring comprehensive coverage of Copenhagen’s trade show scene. Simply click here to receive your free report. Top 5 Trends from CIFF Copenhagen

Trendstop.com is one of the world's leading trend forecasting agencies for fashion and creative professionals, renowned for its insightful trend analysis and forecasts. Clients include H&M, Primark, Forever 21, Zalando, Geox, Evisu, Hugo Boss, L'Oreal and MTV.

All images courtesy of Trendstop: CIFF Trade Show Fall Winter 2018-19

Q&A with Julie Driscoll, Managing Director at Pure London

Q&A Pure London is set to open its Autumn/Winter 2018-2019 edition under its new theme 'We are London' this Sunday. Running from February 11th to 13th at London Olympia, the fashion trade show will present 800 brands across eight curated show sectors. As the largest fashion trade show in London, Pure London is set to welcome more than 17,000 UK international visitors, who come to see the event's offering of emerging talents as well as established brands.

Ahead of its upcoming event, FashionUnited took a moment to speak to Julie Driscoll, Pure London's recently promoted Managing Director to learn more about the current changes taking place at the event, the new sourcing area set to launch as well as its plans for the future.

Q&A with Julie Driscoll, Managing Director at Pure London

What does your new role as Managing Director at Pure London entail?

Julie Driscoll: “I previously served as the Portfolio Director at Pure London and I looked after some other events but only from a commercial point of view. Whereas now I look after all the marketing, all the content, all of the operations as well as the commercial side of things. It really brings brand focus and the possibility to focus on new projects. The whole team was restructured and we have already seen many positive changes as a result of that. For us, it is really important that everyone who works at Pure is an expert in fashion, so I am restructuring the team to ensure that fashion focus and expertise comes across.”

Q&A with Julie Driscoll, Managing Director at Pure London

You previously said that you wanted Pure London to become the biggest men's and women's wear trade show in London - do you feel like you have accomplished this?

“Not yet - it’s still a work in progress. But I think having a women’s wear event that has been running for 20 years and trying to match that to our men’s section which only launched two years ago was possibly a little bit early. However, menswear has done really, really well and we are pleased with the progress that it is making. I think it is an organic growth rather than an exponential growth. Pure London has grown to the size it has because it has built up contacts over the last 20 years and it has taken time to build those key contacts. Retailers, brands, the whole supply chain, we have contacts everywhere.”

“In order to keep on growing, we are extending our knowledge by working with experts like London College of Fashion, Central Saint Martins, and Coloro to ensure the latest trends are reflected in menswear and womenswear presented at the event. We have also realized that being able to tell the story behind the clothing is really important to retailers as well as brands. We don’t get that story from massed produced labels so for independent boutiques, indies, we are encouraging a diversified offering. We are encouraging them to be adventurous and to take on new exciting brands.”

Q&A with Julie Driscoll, Managing Director at Pure London

How has Pure London grown over the past two seasons? What is new this season at Pure London ?

“We grow organically from the sectors we have - menswear, womenswear, footwear, and accessories are the broad areas we have. But we are set to launch a new area this February which is all about sourcing - it’s called Pure Origin. The vision for Pure London is to have a festival of fashion which starts at the fiber and goes all the way through to the finished fashion product. That’s our direction of travel at the moment. We will have over 80 exhibitors from fabric suppliers to manufacturers at Pure London in their own dedicated area. This is the first time we are introducing this concept, it is brand new. It will be supported by a conference, which covers everything from the circular economy through to fashion sourcing.”

Q&A with Julie Driscoll, Managing Director at Pure London

“We also have Coloro , which is a new company that is owned by Ascential and is a sister brand to Pure London. It is a competitor to Pantone and they will be talking about color trends for 2019 and beyond. We will have many different people speaking at the event who have never spoken at Pure London before, like Jonathan Chapman, and it feels very topical because UK consumers are more concerned with the province of their brands. They are more concerned with the story behind the brand - where was it sourced, who are the farmers who made the cotton - all of these things. Buyers and retailers have been very positive about Pure Origin because the time is right to launch it. We are also launching a VIP programme for retailers and buyers who are short on time to learn about the latest trends, fabrics, manufacturers and gain a global overview of what is happening in the industry. We are really going out of our way to connect with a whole new audience who do their own labels, like Debenhams, Marks & Spencer, Tesco who we can invite to Pure now.”

Q&A with Julie Driscoll, Managing Director at Pure London

What do you hope to achieve with the launch of Pure London’s new sourcing event, Pure Origin?

“We are very excited about Pure Origin, I have met some very inspiring people within the fashion supply chain and I am so excited to have conversations with them on how we can move this initiative going forward. We want to educate the whole of the fashion industry supply chain to do things in a more sustainable way. Even if you are not an ethical brand, everyone can work in a more sustainable way. We are trying to figure out how we can help everyone in the fashion supply chain change its way of working.”

“What I’ve also recently learned is t hat there ha ve been so many progressive developments in Asia to ensure great working practices recently as well. Sometimes when we think of the supply chain we may think that all manufacturing is not great but actually there are so many great projects taking place. Factories now offer childcare for female employees or education to the families of workers and there are so many wonderful stories like that which I think the end consumer would interested in hearing. So we are trying to bring these things to life to help demystify the fashion supply chain and help educate brands, retailers and then the end consumer on how the whole supply chain works. We want to shine a light on the manufacturers we work with because they are great, really fantastic and the people we have chosen not to work with because we do not agree with their working practices. These positive stories are the ones want to uncover and share with the industry.”

Q&A with Julie Driscoll, Managing Director at Pure London

How has Pure Man grown since its launch two years ago?

“We are nurturing new brands in menswear at the moment. We are giving them concept stands which similar to a discovery concept where they can learn about the UK market, speak to local retailers who really understand what price points, styles, and collections will sell through. We are very keen to support new talent and bring it back to the UK market. It can take two to three seasons for new brands to see trajection with the bigger retailers - Liberty will watch a brand for two to three season before taking them on board usually. It’s almost like dating - the retailer needs to look, touch and feel the brand, meet the brand owner and director to be sure they can do business.”

What makes Pure London different to the other UK fashion trade fairs?

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“We want to create a festival of fashion where we incorporate and work with our sister brands WGSN and Coloro, where people can come and think about trends and colors for the season ahead. We have brands and manufacturers from every corner of the globe, we cover the whole fashion supply chain. So if retailers and buyers are looking for fabrics, or pattern designs, or innovative ways of printing, or new ways of manufacturing through to new brands - whatever stage you are at throughout the fashion supply chain you will be able to Pure London to find what you need. That is what we want.”

Q&A with Julie Driscoll, Managing Director at Pure London

Will Pure London be launching any new areas next season?

“In July we will be launching a new section, Pure Ethical. We will be working with the World Fashion Forum that is based in the UK and showcase trailblazing ethical brands who will talk to retailers and explain why they are ethical and sustainable. This concept fits in very nicely and follows on beautifully from Pure Origin. It is the natural next step for us to take as well. We aim to start small, with a mixed area of fashion, footwear, and accessories edited together. We are going to work with the Ethical Fashion Forum and we are welcoming applications from brands who have stories to tell. We want to ensure that we really understand the story behind every brand that is part of Pure Ethical. Our aim is for the retailers to meet ethical brands that have a fantastic story to tell. I already have identified quite a number of brands we want to present, but we are welcoming applications at the moment. Many retailers are thinking about sustainability and how they can incorporate these brands into their edit, I think we will see that more and more going forward - the time is right in the UK.”

Q&A with Julie Driscoll, Managing Director at Pure London

What effect do you foresee Brexit having on the UK fashion industry?

“Interestingly Brexit is being received as a great opportunity because people are being more innovative. London will always be regarded as an epicenter for fashion and design, the British Fashion Council really have the view that London is firmly at the cutting edge of trends, forecasting, fashion schools, we have some of the very best designers in the world coming out the UK and based in the UK. Retailers like Clarks recently brought manufacturing back to the UK and I think there will be more people who reshore their manufacturing. We need to make a few tweaks here and there - so why don’t we do it in a sustainable fashion? It is becoming just as competitive to manufacture in European countries as in Asian countries. Brexit is prompting a re-evaluation of how they do business.”

“I am not saying that there are no challenges ahead - there are always challenges in fashion but because we are a global event, based in the UK with brands and visitors from all over the world, it will level out.”

Photos: Courtesy of Pure London

CIFF soon to be in Paris

The just concluded Copenhagen International Fashion Fair (CIFF), which took place last week from 31st January to 2nd February 2018, did not miss the opportunity to announce an upcoming edition this June in Paris.

"Upcoming. CIFF in Paris... Stay tuned. 20 - 26 June 2018" announced a sign at the entrance to the largest and longest-running fashion fair in Northern Europe. The show organisers have had an eye on Paris for a few seasons but it looks like this year, the idea is finally going to materialise.

According to the organisers when speaking to FashionUnited at the show, it is a 'save the date'. However, no further details are available for now. Fact is that the six days chosen will coincide with Men's Fashion Week, which will run from 20th to 24th June, also with Who's Next from 23rd to 25th June, Man / Woman from 21st to 25th June and Tranoï from 22nd to 24th June. This should position CIFF Paris well in the fashion calendar.

The bi-annual show welcomes nearly 2,000 brands across more than 60,000 square meters of exhibition space and can certainly build on their pool of past exhibitors when reaching out to them for the June show in Paris. According to Fashion Network, the organisers have started approaching Scandinavian brands about the June project and dates.

Over the past five years, CIFF has become a major bi-annual destination for the international fashion industry and has reinvented the trade show concept and earned a reputation for being one of Europe’s most dynamic and innovative sales platforms.

Part of CIFF are two specially curated areas - RAVEN for cutting-edge menswear and RAVEN Projects for designers and artists to explore the synergies between fashion and other creative disciplines. Segments within womens- and menswear are Essentials for conceptual womenswear brands and accessories, Future Classics for womenswear, ready-to-wear and accessories, Premium for well-established and contemporary premium brands, Sleek for design-driven premium womenswear brands and Urban for strong international premium brands for men with a particular focus on streetwear and denim.

CIFF is also known for promoting Skandivavian labels and talents, which it does through its Style Setters segment for established and contemporary womenswear brands from across Scandinavia and beyond as well as the Style Setters Bungalow for premium womenswear brands from across Scandinavia and beyond. Lab focuses on unisex contemporary ready-to-wear and fashion-forward streetwear brands from innovative, emerging and established design talents.

After the Paris edition, the next CIFF Copenhagen will take place from 8th to 10th August 2018 at the Bella Center in Copenhagen.

Photo: CIFF

CIFF soon to be in Paris

The just concluded Copenhagen International Fashion Fair (CIFF), which took place last week from 31st January to 2nd February 2018, did not miss the opportunity to announce an upcoming edition this June in Paris.

"Upcoming. CIFF in Paris... Stay tuned. 20 - 26 June 2018" announced a sign at the entrance to the largest and longest-running fashion fair in Northern Europe. The show organisers have had an eye on Paris for a few seasons but it looks like this year, the idea is finally going to materialise.

According to the organisers when speaking to FashionUnited at the show, it is a 'save the date'. However, no further details are available for now. Fact is that the six days chosen will coincide with Men's Fashion Week, which will run from 20th to 24th June, also with Who's Next from 23rd to 25th June, Man / Woman from 21st to 25th June and Tranoï from 22nd to 24th June. This should position CIFF Paris well in the fashion calendar.

The bi-annual show welcomes nearly 2,000 brands across more than 60,000 square meters of exhibition space and can certainly build on their pool of past exhibitors when reaching out to them for the June show in Paris. According to Fashion Network, the organisers have started approaching Scandinavian brands about the June project and dates.

Over the past five years, CIFF has become a major bi-annual destination for the international fashion industry and has reinvented the trade show concept and earned a reputation for being one of Europe’s most dynamic and innovative sales platforms.

Part of CIFF are two specially curated areas - RAVEN for cutting-edge menswear and RAVEN Projects for designers and artists to explore the synergies between fashion and other creative disciplines. Segments within womens- and menswear are Essentials for conceptual womenswear brands and accessories, Future Classics for womenswear, ready-to-wear and accessories, Premium for well-established and contemporary premium brands, Sleek for design-driven premium womenswear brands and Urban for strong international premium brands for men with a particular focus on streetwear and denim.

CIFF is also known for promoting Skandivavian labels and talents, which it does through its Style Setters segment for established and contemporary womenswear brands from across Scandinavia and beyond as well as the Style Setters Bungalow for premium womenswear brands from across Scandinavia and beyond. Lab focuses on unisex contemporary ready-to-wear and fashion-forward streetwear brands from innovative, emerging and established design talents.

After the Paris edition, the next CIFF Copenhagen will take place from 8th to 10th August 2018 at the Bella Center in Copenhagen.

Photo: CIFF Facebook
First Fashionology Summit to take place in Bangladesh

Just a week from now, Bangladesh's capital Dhaka will host the first Fashionolgy Summit, an international event discussing technology and innovation for the fashion industry. The full-day event will be held on Monday, 12th February 2018 at the International Convention Center, Bashundhara (ICCB) in Dhaka.

“Today, technology has become a big part of everyone’s daily life. The fashion and apparel industry is no exception to this. The global production and supply model that has been in existence for decades in the apparel industry has been replaced by fast fashion. We are bringing the most inspiring and innovative thinkers from across the globe under one roof. Our goal is to initiate the much needed conversations on technology, digitisation and innovation inside the apparel industry,” said Mostafiz Uddin, CEO and founder of Bangladesh Apparel Exchange (BAE), the event organiser, when speaking to the Dhaka Tribune.

The Fashiononly Summit is the first event of its kind on garment technology and will bring together the next generation of global fashion experts and Bangladeshi apparel manufacturers in a discussion upon the latest trends that have arisen inside a tech-driven fashion industry. The summit's aim is to familiarize Bangladeshi manufacturers with the latest technology currently trending within the garment industry, to address any questions they may have and to encourage them to use it.

First Fashionology Summit to take place in Bangladesh

A total of 16 renowned speakers from 10 countries are expected, among them Jonathan Zornow, inventor of sewing robot Sewbo; Pradeep David, general manager of Universal Robots South Asia and a pioneer of Cobot concept; Vikas Raykar, an expert on cognitive fashion at IBM Watson; David Birnbaum, strategic advisor to the World Bank; Sunil Shewakramani, executive vice president of Li & Fung India Pvt Ltd; and Muchaneta Kapfunde, founder and editor-in-chief of digital magazine Fashnerd.

The speakers will come together and share their experience and knowledge in four seminars titled “Factory of the Future”, “Smart Wearables (Fusion of Fashion and Tech)”, “Eco and Sustainable Innovation” and “On Demand Manufacturing and Mass Customization”. BAE will also arrange the first ever Digital Tech Fashion Show, which will round off the event.

Exhibitors like Bengal Plastics Ltd., Eton Systems, Juki Smart Solutions, Lectra, Sindabad and Tukatech will present the latest in garment technology and innovation while global initiative Fashion for Good will show how the industry can be improved in terms of environmental and social standards and achieving responsible and sustainable fashion practices.

First Fashionology Summit to take place in Bangladesh

Industry experts like Michael T. Fralix, president and CEO of [TC2]; Frederic Gaillard, vice president of Lectra; Danit Peleg, founder and creative director of 3D Printed Fashion; Richard Oliver, CEO of Theunseen; Ram Sareen, founder and CEO of Tukatech; Amanda Cosco, founder of Electric Runway; Magnus Sundgren, CTO of Eton Systems; Sonia Bashir Kabir, managing director of Microsoft Bangladesh, Eva Van Der Brugge and Pim Kneepkens, innovation manager of Fashion for Good will also be present at the event.

The summit is sponsored by the C&A Foundation, the Kingdom of the Netherlands, Pacific Jeans, Flowater and others.

Photos: BangladeshFashionolgySummit.com
Denim Première Vision coming to London

Denim Première Vision has announced that it is changing the show format to include plans to alternate its location between Paris and another European city, with London being the first location chosen to host the trade show in December 2018.

The trade show, which was launched 10 years ago, has been overhauled to take into account the needs of the entire denim value chain, to include a more fashion-oriented, contemporary positioning, as well as to feature a programme of content, such as speakers, seminars, and debates to discuss challenges facing the sector.

The first edition of 2018 will take place at the Parc Floral de Paris from May 23-24, with the second edition in London at the Old Truman Brewery on Brick Lane, East London, from December 5-6. Both shows will feature exhibitors from across the denim supply chain from weavers, to components, clothing and accessories manufacturers, and denim washers and finishers.

Denim Première Vision coming to London

Organisers state that the early show calendar in December will be beneficial to all players in the supply chain, as well as corresponding with when ‘pure players’ are making final adjustments to their collections pre-production.

In terms of the alternate European location, Denim Première Vision explained that the European cites will be chosen for their “strong fashion influence”, and it hopes that the alternative venue will “encourage proximity with fashion and design markets while offering the sector new sources of inspiration”.

In addition, the Denim Première Vision team is also evolving, with Guglielmo Olearo, international exhibitions director for Première Vision taking over the management of Denim Première Vision. He replaces Chantal Malingrey, a member of the board who, alongside her role as marketing and development director for Première Vision and director of special events will now become the director of the pre-collections show, Blossom Première Vision. Organisers have also named Fabio Adami Dalla Val as the Denim Première Vision show manager.

Images: courtesy of Denim Première Vision

The January edition of White Man and Woman, which took place in Milan, has reported a growth in international buyers at the event, up 3 percent, however, it did also register a slight drop in Italian visitors compared to last January.

The most important countries for White Man and Woman were: Japan, Korea, the UK, Germany and France, while adding that, “prominent presences” also came from Canada and the US.

Massimiliano Bizzi, founder of White, said: “The strategic decision to reposition the trade show in view of the new-fangled project White Street Market, which will entail a new role for ex Ansaldo, has rewarded White owning to the quality of the buyers and of the collections alike.

“The numbers have remained approximately the same as last January, with a slight drop in Italian presences, while the international presences have seen an upturn, both in terms of the quality and quantity of the retailers. We have been working for a while now on the new projects scheduled in June, and we are highly optimistic.”

The trade show states that it was its focus on womenswear pre-collections, as well as the connection with the showrooms thanks to the project Showroom Connection, helped increase the number of buyers.

In addition, its White Street Market has also opened up a new area for the show, and will be turned into the first business-to-consumer and business-to-business sportswear and streetwear trade show in June to coincide with Milan Fashion Week.

White Man and Woman feature both Italian and international brands including Thom Krom, Sartorial Monk, Stighlorgan, Consistence, Rold Skov and Riceman, as well as Aalto, 2ndday, Besfxxk, Alumnae, LaSeine&Moi, Pellico and Quantum Courage.

Timeline: Scoop over the years

TIMELINE London - Scoop, the premium contemporary womenswear and accessories trade fair, is set to return to the Saatchi Gallery this Sunday for its AW18-19 edition. The boutique show, best known for its hand-picked selection of local and international brands, is set to welcome a selection of new brands this season in addition to new initiatives.

Scoop recently teamed up with Alexa Chung's Villoid influencer shops, to support emerging designers in the fashion industry. The initiative, which marks the start of a new shared ambition to support new designers, sees Scoop showcase a number of upcoming brands, including Milk Tooth LDN, Lovers & Drifters and cult knitwear label Hades which have been handpicked by Alexa Chung herself. As Scoop prepares to open its latest edition, FashionUnited takes a moment to reflect on some of Scoop's milestones. Scroll down to read our interactive timeline on Scoop, the UK leading boutique trade fair.

Use the arrows to navigate through the events ordered by date or click on a time frame (in the gray bar) to learn more.

Photo: Amuse, courtesy of Scoop

Q&A with Karen Radley, the founder of Scoop Q&A It's a new year, which means the start of a new fashion calendar. Scoop, premium and contemporary womenswear and accessories tradeshow, is preparing to host its upcoming AW18 edition this weekend. Set to take place from January 28 to 30 at the Saatchi Gallery in London, the contemporary trade fair aims to offer a diverse mix of British and international fashion designers. Presenting more than 250 exhibitors, Scoop is always open to a wide range of designers, ranging from established luxury labels to emerging talents and new brands.

Founded by Karen Radley in February 2011, Scoop has grown over the years to offer a diverse mix of ready-to-wear collection, accessories, footwear, jewelry, homeware as well as a host of lifestyle products, fusing fashion with art. An industry veteran, Radley uses her extensive background in manufacturing and design to select the best brands to show at Scoop. This season is set to see a whole raft of up-and-coming designers make their Scoop debut, including Celeste Mogador, Atoir, Lucilla, Blugirl Folies and Loreak as well as independent skincare brand Malin + Goetz, who are set to present a new fragrance at Scoop. Ahead of Scoop's AW 18 edition, FashionUnited took a moment to speak with Radley to learn more about the history of Scoop and her plans for the future.

Q&A with Karen Radley, the founder of Scoop

FashionUnited: What first inspired you to launch Scoop in 2011?

Karen Radley: “I was previously an agent for a premium contemporary clothing brand and couldn’t find a suitable trade show in the UK to exhibit with, I was looking for something exciting in a venue that wasn’t a boring exhibition centre…realising there was nothing in the marketplace I thought why not set up my own show, I had the contacts and the drive to create something great.”

How has Scoop grown since then?

“We exhibit in the beautiful and listed Saatchi Gallery, so the surroundings can sometimes be restricting in what can do in terms of installations. But in terms of content, we constantly evolve and are introducing new and emerging brands, always inviting new buyers we make sure there is something fresh each time for everyone that attends.”

Q&A with Karen Radley, the founder of Scoop

In your opinion, what makes Scoop unique compared to other fashion trade shows in the UK?

“I think my relationships with the brands and buyers is quite unusual, as these types of events are usually run by bigger corporations, so there is an independent and personal feel to the show. I spend a lot of time coming up with ideas for new initiatives and partnerships that can add value and creativity to the show so it doesn’t feel like a typical trade event. I’m also constantly searching for new contemporary brands that will suit the mix.”

What is new at Scoop this season?

“I am very excited about our collaboration with Villoid, Alexa Chung’s online curated retail platform. They will be bringing 4 emerging designers to the show to exhibit their collections. In addition, I am thrilled to have new brands on board including wonderful clothing from Blugirl Folies and Lucille, accessories from Celeste Mogador and Harc Paris, jewellery from Vaubel New York and Lalique, homeware from Moismont, millinery from Petusa and perfume and beauty products from incredible New York brand Malin and Goetz, who will be presenting a fragrance at the show that we use throughout the venue in the bathrooms and public spaces as well as on their stand.”

Q&A with Karen Radley, the founder of Scoop

What do you hope to achieve with Scoop's partnership with Trouva and Villoid this season?

“With Villoid we have the same ethos in wanting to support emerging, young designers and recognising how important this is to help the industry grow in an exciting way, we are giving 4 of the designers from their online platform space at the show to hopefully meet new and existing retailers and to network within the industry.”

“Trouva is a slightly different proposition as they are a platform for independent bricks and mortar retailers and will be bringing their portfolio of buyers to the show and hosting a champagne networking breakfast. Hopefully bringing these two worlds together will create some commercial relationships that are beneficial all round.”

What things do you look for when searching for new designers or brands to show at Scoop?

“I base it purely on design, quality and innovation and not on pricing. Also, the mix has to be right for Scoop, you can’t have too many similar brands exhibiting as it becomes monotonous for buyers and they won’t return. Scoop is a platform to bring established and emerging designers and UK and international buyers under one roof within a beautiful location. We are very lucky to have the stunning Saatchi Gallery as our venue for Scoop and this also helps to attract the right audience.”

Q&A with Karen Radley, the founder of Scoop

Why is Scoop focusing more on homeware and perfumery this season? Are there other areas Scoop aims to grow in?

“I feel this is such a lovely area to develop and have a real weakness for anything to do with the home and perfumery. I would like to continue developing the perfume and fragrance side of the business and I think concept stores and lifestyle retailers like to see them all under one roof.”

What are your plans for the future of Scoop?

“To keep it as the perfect trade show and always evolving. Scoop always looks at trends and being at the forefront so I’ll strive to continue this and continue to introduce new emerging labels that create a point of difference.

Where do you see Scoop in the next 5 years?

“Growing organically with me still as the driving creative force.”

Read more: Preview: The leading UK Fashion trade shows

Photos: Courtesy of Karen Radley and Scoop